J.C.Murrell@uea.ac.uk

+44 (0)1603 592959 (office) / +44 (0)1603 592239 (lab)

 

Nasmille Larke-Mejía

Nasmille is Postdoc at GROW Colombia working in the Agricultural Diversity Programme. She focuses on studying the microbial ecology of soils associated to different crops (sugarcane and coffee) and the Colombian Páramo environment. Nasmille is an Environmental Microbiologist, specialized in the use of cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent methods to study the microbial ecology of microorganisms in the terrestrial environment. Nasmille finished her PhD in 2018 at the School of Environmental Sciences (ENV) at University of East Anglia (UEA) funded by a Colombian government (Colciencias) Scholarship. Under the supervision of Professor J Colin Murrell, Nasmille worked on characterizing soil and phyllosphere microorganisms that use isoprene as their sole source of C using techniques including stable isotope probing (SIP), amplicon sequencing and metagenome analysis. Previously, as part of the CIMIC lab at Universidad de los Andes in Colombia, Nasmille isolated and studied ANFO-degrading bacteria from an open coal mine pit and their expression of nitrogen cycle genes in presence of the explosive.

Faculty group: Organisms and Ecosystems

Projects you are working on: GROW-Colombia project

Email: nasmille.mejia-florez@earlham.ac.uk

Linkedin: Nasmille L. Larke-Mejía

Twitter: @NasmiMejia

Publications:

Nasmille L. Larke-Mejía, Andrew T. Crombie, Jennifer Pratscher, Terry J. McGenity and J. Colin Murrell.. Novel isoprene-degrading Proteobacteria from soil and leaves identified by cultivation and analysis of metagenomes from stable isotope probing experiments. Submitted to Microbiome June 2019.

Carrión O, Larke-Mejía NL, Gibson L, Farhan Ul Haque M, Ramiro-García J, McGenity TJ, et al. Gene probing reveals the widespread distribution, diversity and abundance of isoprene-degrading bacteria in the environment. Microbiome. 2018;6:219. doi:10.1186/s40168-018-0607-0.

Crombie AT, Larke-Mejía NL, Emery H, Dawson R, Pratscher J, Murphy GP, et al. Poplar phyllosphere harbors disparate isoprene-degrading bacteria. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018;I:13081–6. doi:10.1073/pnas.1812668115

Andrew T. Crombie, Nasmille L. Mejia-Florez, Terry J. McGenity, and J. Colin Murrell (2018) Genetics and Ecology of Isoprene Degradation. F. Rojo (ed.), Aerobic Utilization of Hydrocarbons, Oils and Lipids, Handbook of Hydrocarbon and Lipid Microbiology.

Rachael E. Antwis, Sarah M. Griffiths, Xavier A. Harrison, Paz Aranega-Bou, Andres Arce, Aimee S. Bettridge, Francesca L. Brailsford, Alexandre de Menezes, Andrew Devaynes,Kristian M. Forbes, Ellen L. Fry, Ian Goodhead, Erin Haskell, Chloe Heys, Chloe James, Sarah R. Johnston, Gillian R. Lewis, Zenobia Lewis, Michael C. Macey, Alan McCarthy, James E. McDonald, Nasmille L. Mejia-Florez, David O’Brien, Chlo´e Orland, Marco Pautasso, William D. K. Reid, Heather A. Robinson,Kenneth Wilson and William J. Sutherland. Fifty important research questions inmicrobial ecology. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 2017, Vol. 93, No. 5.

Qualifications:

PhD Environmental Microbiology (2018)
Awarded a full scholarship by Colciencias
J. Colin Murrell Lab at University of East Anglia
Norwich, England
Thesis title: “Microbial Ecology of Isoprene Degraders in the Terrestrial Environment”

MSc Microbiology (2010)
Awarded a full scholarship by Universidad de los Andes.
Centro de Investigaciones Microbiologicas (CIMIC) at Universidad de los Andes.
Bogotá, Colombia.
Thesis title: “An Explosive Condition: Open Cast Pit Mining Culturable Microbial Subsurface Diversity and the Expression of Nitrogen Cycle Genes”

BSc Microbiology (2008)
Centro de Investigaciones Microbiologicas (CIMIC) at Universidad de los Andes.
Bogotá, Colombia.
Thesis title: “Characterization of prominent aerobic coal mine original bacteria that employ the explosive ANFO as an alternative carbon and nitrogen source.”

BSc Biology (2008)
Centro de Investigaciones Microbiologicas (CIMIC) at Universidad de los Andes.
Bogotá, Colombia.
Thesis title: “Characterization of prominent aerobic coal mine original bacteria that employ the explosive ANFO as an alternative carbon and nitrogen source.”

Funding:

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